The route: Province of Trieste

Austro-Hungarian War Cemetery


Mount Ermada, in the territory of Duino-Aurisina, is one of the most symbolic WWI battlefields. Because of its strategic position, that permits to control both the passages...

read more...
 

Austro-Hungarian War Cemetery


Mount Ermada, in the territory of Duino-Aurisina, is one of the most symbolic WWI battlefields. Because of its strategic position, that permits to control both the passages towards Trieste and the valley of Bretovizza (Brestovica, Slovenia), it became the cornerstone of the southern front. The Austrians turned the mountain into a huge fortification with trenches and many shelters, dug into rock, or adapted from existing caves.
Thousands of Italian soldiers died trying to conquer this last austro-hungarian fortress on the way to Trieste. Around the top, many items witness the ancient conflict: fortifications, caverns, observatories, wrecked passages and underground shelters for men and cannons.

The austro-hungarian war cemetery of Aurisina rises at the bottom of a karstic basin (dolina), where 1.934 Austrian WWI soldiers rest. They died approximately between 1915 and 1917 in the land between Monfalcone and Mount Ermada. The graveyard, encircled by a rock wall, is marked by rough stone crosses, on which are engraved, in pairs, the names of the soldiers, among whom lies the Italian Giovanni Driol, soldier of the 56th Infantry Regiment.

Near the mouth of the near Timavo, in San Giovanni, a few kilometers from Mount Ermada, stands, on a rocky outcrop, the monument to the "Wolves of Tuscany", the brave soldiers of the brigade Tuscany, who were engaged in attacks during the May of 1917 in the tenth battle of the Isonzo.
In 1916 they conquered Mount Sabotino and Dosso Faiti. Thanks to their value and courage they were nicknamed “Wolves” by the enemies themselves. At the end of the war, the brigade was awarded the gold medal for military valor.
The monument consists of two bronze wolves: the first points toward Mount Ermada and is portrayed while calling the herd, the other keeps his eyes down, as to control the movements of the enemy.
In the nearby, a memorial stone is dedicated to Major John Randaccio, the commander of the brigade who died during the tenth battle and is still buried in the Heroes Cemetery of Aquileia.


Trieste and Prosecco


On October 24, 1917, Austro-hungarian troops burst through the northern front of Isonzo and encircled the II^ Italian Army in Caporetto. The battle was tragic...

read more...
 

Trieste and Prosecco


On October 24, 1917, Austro-hungarian troops burst through the northern front of Isonzo and encircled the II^ Italian Army in Caporetto. The battle was tragic to the Italians who lost a great deal of assets and men. 350.000 soldiers beat a disorganized retreat while 400.000 citizens run away from the invaded zones. The defeat of Caporetto caused the collapse of the entire front and the retreat that stopped only on the first front of the Piave, and saw Italy withstand the Austrian onslaught and then, in early October 1918, launch an offensive that ended with the defeat of the Austro-Germans.
On November 3, Italian soldiers entered in Trento and, in the meantime, the bersaglieri, who went ashore in Trieste, found a joyful crowd on the dock. Fanfare in the head, the regiment walked towards the Oberdan barrack; trumpets played the famous song "Girls of Trieste" and the city became a riot. People came out in the streets to celebrate the liberation, and women milled around to snatch a feather from the soldiers’ hats.
Trieste dedicated a monument to this episode which was built in the exact landing spot. The memorial is a complex of bronze statues that depicts a bersagliere, with a banner, and two girls while sewing a tricolor flag to show at the Italians’ arrival in the city. The monument was inaugurated in 2004, as a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the return of Trieste to Italy.

Victory’s Lighthouse, which is visible from the coastal road leading into town, is yet another token of “Italianity” in Trieste.
It was built in 1927 by architect Arduino Berlam who wanted it both to guide mariners and to be a memorial to those who lost their lives in the sea during WWI.
On the wide stand at the base (in which is incorporated a round bastion of the former Austrian fort of Kressich, where a gun battery was built by the Austrian government, in defense of the Gulf of Trieste) rises a column. A capital supports the "coffa "(literally “crow’s nest”, it’s an explicit reference to ships masts), in which the bronze crystal cage of the lantern is inserted and covered by a dome decorated with bronze scales. At the apex of the dome stands the copper statue of the Winged Victory, underneath there’s that of the Unknown Sailor, under which it is affixed the anchor of the Audace (the first Italian ship to enter the port of Trieste on November 3, 1918).

In Prosecco there’s one of the most important Austro-Hungarian graveyards in Italy. It is located at the bottom of a sinkhole and contains the remains of 5,050 men who lost their lives in battles on the Isonzo and on Karst during the First World War.
The family names engraved on the crosses are of German, Slavic, Hungarian, Polish and also Italian strain, as to witness the multiplicity of peoples who made up the Habsburg Empire.


Download pdf percorso